Los Angeles County

Los Angeles County is known throughout the world as the home of Hollywood and the birthplace of the motion picture industry. But for people more familiar with the real Los Angeles County, it is a diverse cultural and geographic area that stretches far beyond the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Brahman’s Chinese Theater and Olivera Street.

Many people are familiar with the landmarks in the city of Los Angeles. Thousands of visitors from all over the world flock to the city every year to see the Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Hollywood Bowl. The county of Los Angeles however, is so much more.

Los Angeles Demographics

If Los Angeles County were a nation, its economy would be the 19th largest in the world. Los Angeles County has the largest population of any county in the nation. The city of Los Angeles is the second largest city in the country after New York.

Here in California 27% of the residents live in Los Angeles County. There are 27 public community colleges and universities which service in and out-of-state students. Many high school graduates are drawn to the beaches they see on television but are pleasantly surprised to find 65,528 acres of parks, gardens, lakes, trails and natural areas. Los Angeles County also hosts the world’s largest public golf course system.

The 88 cities that make up Los Angeles County are a testament to its cultural diversity. Los Angeles County is host to more than 140 cultures. From Beverly Hills to Diamond Bar, Pico Rivera to Malibu, Los Angeles County lives, breathes and works in as many as 224 languages.

Los Angeles Terrain

The terrain in Los Angeles County is just as diverse as the culture. Thanks to the Beach Boys, everyone knows about the fabulous beaches. But Los Angeles County also encompasses towering mountain ranges, deep valleys, forests, islands, lakes, rivers, and desert.

The western part of the Mojave Desert begins in the Antelope Valley. The Mojave Desert receives less than 13″ of rain a year and temperatures can reach 125 degrees in the summer. Yet, in the same county, the San Gabriel Mountains are filled with coniferous forests and plentiful snowfall in the winter. The San Gabriel Mountains are also home to the well-known Mount Wilson where the Mount Wilson Observatory is located.

Los Angeles County as a whole is a pleasant surprise. Knowing that you can ski in the San Gabriels in the morning and sit on the beach in the afternoon is something no other county in the country can boast. Add in the glamour and glitz of “tinsel town” and Los Angeles County is a must see.